John Bachman
Symposium
20-23 April 2006
"Nature, God & Social Reform in the Old South"
The Life & Work of the
Rev. John Bachman
An International Symposium
in Honor of the

SYMPOSIUM
INFORMATION

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Newberry College


Introduction
Personal Background
Religion & Ministry
Natural History
Audubon Connection
Politics/Social Reform
Education & Academia
Newberry Connections

Bachman Timeline

Bachman Resources



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FLYING BRIDGE
TECHNOLOGIES
Charlotte NC


MR. BILL HILTON JR.

Executive Director & Educator-Naturalist
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
York SC


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
for Bill Hilton Jr.

BILL HILTON JR. taught at the high school and college levels and helped start the residential South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics in Hartsville, which he served as biology instructor and director of student research. He was twice named South Carolina Science Teacher of the Year and was honored as the state's Outstanding Biology Teacher. Hilton continues his work as an educator through lectures and workshops he presents for students and teachers in schools and school districts and for other groups; as a consultant in science curriculum design and implementation and in outdoor learning; and, as a widely published author on nature and education. Hilton has studied extensively and trained students, teachers, and "citizen scientists" across the U.S. and abroad in Australia, Canada, and Costa Rica. In 1998, The Charlotte Observer named Hilton a Carolinas "Guardian of the Environment" for a lifetime of trend-setting work in environmental education and conservation.

Hilton is based near York, South Carolina, at Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History (www.hiltonpond.org), a 501(c)(3) non-profit research, education, and conservation organization he founded on family property in 1982 and has served since as Executive Director. He has a National Science Foundation grant in support of Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project (www.rubythroat.org), a cross-disciplinary initiative that builds international collaboration among students and teachers by using distribution and behavior of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Archilochus colubris, as core topics. Hilton is a 1970 graduate of Newberry College (A.B. Philosophy), which he now serves as president of the Alumni Association.


ABSTRACT OF KEYNOTE ADDRESS
by Bill Hilton Jr.

BACHMAN IN THE SHADOW OF AUDUBON? NOT ANY MORE.

The Rev. John Bachman, whose "day job" as a Lutheran clergyman consumed considerable time, still found time for first-rate nature study--a pursuit that had piqued his interest from childhood in rural New York State. Often overlooked by historians, he was one of the great American naturalists of the 19th century--a point not ignored by John James Audubon or by European scientists who honored his accomplishments. Although Audubon gained popular fame for his magnificent bird paintings, Bachman was far superior as a scientist; he discovered new species of birds and mammals--including Bachman's Warbler and Bachman's Sparrow--but few laymen know just how important he was in describing native species. Perhaps his greatest scientific contribution was writing the complete text for Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, the moumental folio of mammals for which Audubon and his sons rendered the illustrations. Along with his taxonomic work, Bachman also conducted field experiments on animal behavior and published his results in diverse journals. His personal investigations and association with the "Circle of Naturalists" in antebellum Charleston made that coastal city a hotbed of scientific discourse, rivaling Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. The academic world suffered a great loss when Union soldiers destroyed Bachman's library and natural history specimens before they could be transported to Newberry College during the Civil War, but Bachman's legacy lives on in his writings about Lowcountry natural history.

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