John Bachman
Symposium
20-23 April 2006
"Nature, God & Social Reform in the Old South"
The Life & Work of the
Rev. John Bachman
An International Symposium
in Honor of the

SYMPOSIUM
INFORMATION

Main
Overview
Schedule
Keynote Speakers
Call for Papers
Registration
Who's Coming?
Lodging
Travel
On-line Art Exhibit
For Kids
For Teachers
Partners
Supporters
Proceedings

Guestbook
Contact Info

Newberry College


Introduction
Personal Background
Religion & Ministry
Natural History
Audubon Connection
Politics/Social Reform
Education & Academia
Newberry Connections

Bachman Timeline

Bachman Resources



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FOR TEACHERS

This section will include lesson plans, activities, and other information about John Bachman that will be of use to teachers who want to help their students learn more about just how important Bachman was in the history of South Carolina.


Suggested topics that could be researched and presented by lay people or by high school, college, or seminary students and faculty during the John Bachman Symposium concurrent paper session. (Papers are 10-12 minutes with three minutes for discussion.)

  • Bachman's 1838 trip to Europe
  • Bachman genealogy, both ancestors and descendants
  • Maria Martin Bachman's artistic contributions to natural history
  • Scientific-artistic collaborations between Bachman and Audubon
  • Bachman's day-to-day life in Charleston
  • Bachman's use of the scientific method in observations of animal behavior
  • Bachman's tenure as president of Newberry College board of trustees
  • Bachman sermons at St. John's Lutheran Church
  • Bachman's 1851 letter to Henry Summer discussing secession & Compromise of 1850
  • Bachman's trip to see President Millard Fillmore in Washington DC
  • Contradictions between Bachman's scientific writings and personal beliefs on slavery
  • Etc.

NEWBERRY COLLEGE FACULTY ALREADY INVOLVING THEIR STUDENTS
IN THE JOHN BACHMAN SYMPOSIUM

--JOEL BOYTER, director of Langford Communications Center

  • Students in a basic video course will be shooting news packages during the Symposium

--SALLY CHERRINGTON-BEGGS, assistant professor of music; music department chair

  • Organizing student vocal and instrumental groups and individuals to participate in various aspects of the Symposium

--BRET CLARK, associate professor of biology

  • Zoology students select an animal named for Bachman and provide a mini-life history of the species, including Bachman's contributions to knowledge/study of the animal

--K. DOUGLAS COOK, adjunct professor of speech

  • Speech students will interview and compete to introduce each keynote speaker during the Symposium (teaming with Prof. Gagliano, below)
  • All 60 speech students are required to attend and critique all six keynote presentations

--INGE DUBE, associate professor of foreign languages; department chair

  • Students are responding--in German--to a written questionnaire about Bachman's life and work

--KATHLYN FRITZ, associate professor of sociology

  • Students in Summerland Honors Class (named for all-female Summerland Collge that merged with Newberry College) have option of writing response paper on three of Symposium keynote presentations.
  • One student is looking at scientific categories used by Bachman, comparing his work to modern approaches

--PATRICK GAGLIANO, professor of theater & speech

  • Drama students will fill acting roles or polish technical skills during the original John Bachman play at Newberry Opera House
  • Speech students will interview and compete to introduce each keynote speaker during the Symposium (teaming with Prof. Cook, above)
  • All 60 speech students are required to attend and critique all six keynote presentations

--PAUL HAUGHT, assistant professor of philosophy & ethics

  • Senior philosophy seminar students are investigating issues in environmental justice, looking for ways Bachman's naturalism and commitment to racial equality are echoed in contemporary advocacy for environmental justice

--CHARLES HORN, professor of biology; department chair

  • Environmental Science students are researching whether Bachman was an "environmentalist"

--WAYNE KANNADAY, associate professor of religion & philosophy

  • New Testament students are encouraged to do research papers about Bachman's use of writings of the apostle Paul and to present concurrent papers at the Symposium

--BILL LONG, associate professor of music; director of bands

  • Jazz band will perform at mixer during the Symposium

--CATHERINE D. LOVETT, assistant professor of biology

  • Genetics students are comparing accuracy in taxonomic techniques between Bachman's time and today, particularly with regard to DNA techniques unavailable until recently
  • One student, a Bachman descendant, is investigating her family pedigree and the inheritance of certain traits and talents

--BRUCE NELLSMITH, associate professor of art; department chair

  • Upperclass Art students are designing and painting a four-panel 6' x 16' mural that depicts various aspects of Bachman's life (teaming with Prof. Riddle, below)

--JODIE PEELER, assistant professor of communications

  • Journalism students are including Bachman articles in the student-edited campus newspaper
  • Communications students are interviewing Bachman authorities and taping a half-hour documentary on Bachman's life and work

--PAULA RIDDLE, assistant professor of art

  • Upperclass Art students are designing and painting a four-panel 6' x 16' mural that depicts various aspects of Bachman's life (teaming with Prof. Nellsmith, above)

--TANIA SOSIAK, assistant professor of graphic design

  • Seniors are designing the Symposium Souvenir Program, complete with original artwork, and including schedule, abstracts, participant list, and Bachman background info

--JEFFREY STOUT, provost & vice president for academic affairs

The provost has created two College-wide essay contests, described in detail by clicking on the highlighted links below:

  • With the history faculty, an essay contest on "1856," in which the writer will argue why a particular American event was important in history, including how the event was related to the founding of colleges in the 19th century. The prizes are immediate fame and fortune, the latter being a Sesquicentennial penny minted in 1856.
  • With the biology faculty, an essay contest on "Who Killed Bachman's Warber?"--or who DIDN'T--the prizes being instantaneous prestige and The Official Audubon Birds of America 150th Anniversary Commemorative Stamp Album.

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